Confessions of a Female Engineer

Ask me anything   I'm a second year geological engineering student who loves coffee and tv, and am a little more superstitious than I would care to admit to my friends/family.

My home is Coastal BC, but here I find myself in the middle of Saskatchewan for school.

"Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

always reblog because you know women

(via alternageek)

(via itwasbetterwithaunibrow)

— 16 hours ago with 146726 notes
#astronomy 

helpfvl:

me on the first day of school: i have my pencil and tears ready 

(via sorry-im-not-home-right-now)

— 5 days ago with 144872 notes
#school  #back to school  #ready 
taylorsummach:

"The Airplane Room" is a large, multi-tiered lecture theater located within the Thorvaldson building on the University of Saskatchewan campus. Over the course of the the room’s 73 year existence, students have thrown messages in the form of paper airplanes at the room’s large, domed ceiling. Legend has it that pilots in training during the Second World War began the practice. If their plane were ever to fall from the dome, it indicated that the pilot had died.
 I took this photograph on an impromptu visit to the campus. I had to shoot multiple shots at a high ISO and stitch the results together in order to capture the full height of the room. The results are a little messy and had I been more prepared, I would have brought a tripod in order to photograph the room properly.

thorv 271

taylorsummach:

"The Airplane Room" is a large, multi-tiered lecture theater located within the Thorvaldson building on the University of Saskatchewan campus. Over the course of the the room’s 73 year existence, students have thrown messages in the form of paper airplanes at the room’s large, domed ceiling. Legend has it that pilots in training during the Second World War began the practice. If their plane were ever to fall from the dome, it indicated that the pilot had died.


I took this photograph on an impromptu visit to the campus. I had to shoot multiple shots at a high ISO and stitch the results together in order to capture the full height of the room. The results are a little messy and had I been more prepared, I would have brought a tripod in order to photograph the room properly.

thorv 271

— 6 days ago with 20 notes
#thorv 271 

#notwantingtogetoutofthecarbecausecarryonmywaywardsonjustcameontheradio

— 1 week ago

sixpenceee:

27 years of satellite pictures turned into GIFS. 

Google created the original gifs and TIME supported the time-lapse project. NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat program is how the images were collected in the first place. 

I found this via UPWORTHY

(via postgraduatepurgatory)

— 1 week ago with 8686 notes
#human impact  #changes  #gif  #satellite  #google  #time lapse 
crusherccme:

my aunt found this for me. as a woman going into engineering, it really speaks to me

crusherccme:

my aunt found this for me. as a woman going into engineering, it really speaks to me

(via pautoc)

— 3 weeks ago with 7842 notes
#feminism  #engineering 
The trouble with tribbles is that they get into EVERYTHING. Found this one in my bed this morning.

The trouble with tribbles is that they get into EVERYTHING. Found this one in my bed this morning.

— 3 weeks ago
#tos 
I asked my sister to made a fruit arrangement for our centrepiece.

I asked my sister to made a fruit arrangement for our centrepiece.

— 3 weeks ago
REBLOG

studyforyourself:

If you have a study/college blog please reblog this. I´m making a new list of Study Blogs.

(via attackonstudying)

— 3 weeks ago with 223 notes
compoundchem:

Nice graphic from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions page to mark the 45th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing.

compoundchem:

Nice graphic from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions page to mark the 45th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing.

(via anengineersaspect)

— 4 weeks ago with 763 notes
#moon  #composition  #chemistry  #geology  #proto earth  #science